Everyday Hero: Pacific Wild Life Conservatory
Oil Pipelines and Spirit Bears
Pacific Wild Wild Life Conservatory

Join their Facebook group at: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Spoil/197923533566080?sk=wall
Contact Ian McAllister at Tel: 1 250 957-2480, email: This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it Website: www.pacificwild.org

By BARBARA YAFFE 4 MAR 2011 COMMENTS(1) POWER PLAY
VANCOUVER SUN
http://communities.canada.com/vancouversun/blogs/powerplay/archive/2011/03/04/oil-pipelines-and-spirit-bears.aspx

Environmentalists have fired off another round in the ongoing dispute
between Enbridge's proposed Northern Gateway pipeline and those who believe
a pipeline across B.C. connecting to an oil tanker port in Kitimat would
spell the end of what is best about northern British Columbia.

A 44-minute film, titled SpOILed, provides a spectacular look at life along
an absolutely pristine coastline aruond Douglas Channel and within the Great
Bear Rainforest, climaxing at the 36-minute mark with incredible, up-close
shots of the breathtaking white animal known as the spirit bear.
http://vimeo.com/19582018

The rare bear stands as a potent symbol of the undisturbed natural bounty
that stands to be disrupted by the pipeline project, which would include
coastal infrastructure to facilitate shipments of oilsands petroleum to
Asian markets. Some 225 tanker trips would be made annually, with each
vessel having to make five hard-right turns along 20 miles of intricate and
narrow coastal passageways. It speaks to the huge price human beings pay for
their largely unchecked appetite for oil, a resource the film's creators
believe should be used "sparingly, as a strategic reserve and a pathway to a
cleaner and more renewable energy future.

"Indigenous communities have made it clear," the film pronounces, "this
pipeline is yet another example of the devastating exploitation of native
people and their lands in our pursuit of fossil fuels...This project won't
just destroy native culture, it will decide the energy future of the North
American continent."

At the conclusion of the film, a narrator asks the viewer to telephone the
prime minister's office to urge the government to introduce an oil tanker
ban on B.C. north coast.

A project of Pacificwild.org, the film was initially shown Feb. 16 at the
Vancouver International Mountain Film Festival, at the Centennial Theatre in
North Vancouver and is about to shown across North America.  It reflects the
work of a group of 10 renowned nature photographers from six countries who
were invited to the area to document the undisturbed landscape while it
remains undisturbed. Visuals of Pacific salmon, sea lions and other marine
life are awesome and give the rest of us some insight into the sky-high
stakes in the coming pipeline battle.

Join their Facebook group at: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Spoil/197923533566080?sk=wall
Contact Ian McAllister at Tel: 1 250 957-2480, email: This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it

Website: www.pacificwild.org

 
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